Graduate Catalog
2018-2019
 
Policies, Procedures, Academic Programs
Engineering Mechanics
College of Engineering
Academics and engineering adtninistration. Formerly called Engineering Building. Southwest wing completed Spring 1960; cost $377,983; North wing, joining Holden Hall, completed Summer 1962; cost $529,100. Total building contains 72,375 sq. ft. Named after Earle Bertram Norris (1882-1966) who was Dean of the School of Engineering from 1928 to 1952 and Director of the Engineering Experiment Station from 1932 to 1952.
333 Norris Hall Blacksburg VA 24061
Norris Hall
Degree(s) Offered:
• MS
MS Degree in Engineering Mechanics
Minimum GPA: 3.0
Offered In:
Blacksburg
• MEng
MEng Degree in Engineering Mechanics
Minimum GPA: 3.0
Offered In:
Blacksburg
• PhD
PhD Degree in Engineering Mechanics
Minimum GPA: 3.0
Offered In:
Blacksburg
Email Contact(s):
Web Resource(s):
Phone Number(s):
540/231-0752
Application Deadlines:
Fall: Jan 11
Directions
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Norris Hall

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Interim Department Head : Pamela VandeVord
Graduate Program Director : Shane Ross (Graduate Chair of Engineering Mechanics)
Emeriti Faculty: Norman Dowling; John Duke; John Grant; Mahendra Singh
Professors: Romesh Batra; Scott Case; Mark Cramer; Rafael Davalos; David Dillard; Thomas Dingus; Stefan Duma; Hampton Gabler; Robert Gourdie (VTCRI); Muhammad Hajj; John Lesko; Steven McKnight (National Capital Region); Saad Ragab; Shane Ross; Mark Stremler; Pamela VandeVord
Associate Professors: Raffaella De Vita; Zachary Doerzaph; Scott Hendricks; Sunghwan Jung; Stephen LaConte (VTCRI); Yong Lee; Miguel Perez; Steven Poelzing (VTCRI); Robin Queen; John Socha; Anne Staples; Surot Thangjitham; Costin Untaroiu; Mark Van Dyke; Vincent Wang
Assistant Professors: Nicole Abaid; Jonathan Boreyko; Guohua Cao; John Chappell (VTCRI); John Domann; Hosein Foroutan; James Hanna; Andrew Kemper; Alexei Morozov (VTCRI); Jennifer Munson; Steven Rowson; Shima Shahab; Alexandrina Untaroiu; Scott Verbridge; Eli Vlaisavljevich
Affiliated Faculty: Alan Asbeck; Jonathan Black; Tomonari Furukawa; Scott Huxtable; Rakesh Kapania; Rolf Mueller; Alexey Onufriev; Robert Parker; Mayuresh Patil; Gary Seidel; Danesh Tafti; Saied Taheri; Pablo Tarazaga; Leigh Winfrey; Craig Woolsey
Clifton C. Garvin Professor: Romesh Batra
Reynolds Metals Professor: Scott Case
Adhesive & Sealant Science Professor: David Dillard
J. Byron Maupin Professor: Muhammad Hajj
Engineering Science and Mechanics Program Chair: Scott Hendricks
L. Preston Wade Professor: Rafael Davalos
Norris and Laura Mitchell Professor of Aerospace Engineering: Rakesh Kapania
L.S. Randolph Professor: Robert Parker
Harry C. Wyatt Professor, ICTAS Director: Stefan Duma
Samuel Herrick Professor: Hampton Gabler
N. Waldo Harrison Professor: Pamela VandeVord
Newport News Shipbuilding Professor, VTTI Director: Thomas Dingus

Engineering Mechanics Introduction

The Engineering Mechanics (EM) program provides a strong foundation and sturdy framework for the discovery, development, transfer, and implementation of new knowledge in the areas of mechanics of materials and material systems, fluid mechanics, dynamics and vibration, biomechanics, and computational and experimental methods. The Department of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics (BEAM), home to the EM program, is fully committed to providing an environment for strong undergraduate and graduate education that emphasizes fundamental understanding, high-quality teaching, frontier-level research, innovation, and service to the professional mechanics community.

Instilling EM graduates with a highly flexible professional perspective enables them to pursue successful careers in a variety of engineering industries, in research environments, and in higher education. Indeed, EM graduates now populate prominent engineering departments across the nation and are transmitting the values of their engineering science training to new generations of students. Our graduates also serve as science and technology advisors to local, regional, and federal governmental organizations; hold leadership positions in professional societies; and are active participants in public discourse on the role and value of engineering science in relation to the research and educational competitiveness of the Commonwealth of Virginia and our nation.

Offered In (Blacksburg)

Degree Requirements

Minimum GPA: 3.0
Institution code: 5859
Testing Requirements:
  • TOEFL
    • Paper
      • 577.0
    • Computer
      • 233.0
    • iBT
      • 90.0

MS thesis option

Students pursuing the MS thesis degree option must complete at least 30 credit hours, including at least 21 graded course credit hours and satisfactorily prepare and defend a master’s thesis. The final transcript will designate the degree as thesis.

The MS thesis option must satisfy the following requirements:

  • ESM 5994 Research and Thesis (at least 6 credits)
  • ESM 5014 Introduction to Continuum Mechanics (3 credits)
  • One ESM 5xxx/6xxx course in two of the following three areas: dynamics, solid mechanics, or fluid mechanics (3 credits in each area, for a total of 6 credits)
  • One course satisfying the mathematics requirement (3 credits)
  • Graded elective courses (at least 9 credits)

MS students must also register for at least two semesters for one credit hour of 5944 Seminar. These seminar credits are not included on the Plan of Study.

The MS Plan of Study may contain a combination of 5xxx and 6xxx-level courses and a maximum of six (6) hours of approved 4xxx-level courses.

MS non-thesis option

Students pursuing the MS non thesis degree option must complete at least 30 graded course credit hours and satisfactorily pass a comprehensive oral examination. The final transcript will designate the degree as non thesis.

The MS non-thesis option Plan of Study must include at least 30 credit hours that satisfy the following requirements:

  • ESM 5014 Introduction to Continuum Mechanics (3 credits)
  • Two ESM 5xxx/6xxx courses in two of the following areas: dynamics, solid mechanics, or fluid mechanics (3 credits in each area, for a total of 6 credits)
  • One course satisfying the mathematics requirement (3 credits)
  • Graded elective courses (at least 18 credits)

MS students must also register for at least two semesters for one credit hour of 5944 Seminar. These seminar credits are not included on the Plan of Study.

The MS Plan of Study may contain a combination of 5xxx and 6xxx-level courses and a maximum of six (6) hours of approved 4xxx-level courses.

Offered In (Blacksburg)

Degree Requirements

Minimum GPA: 3.0
Institution code: 5859
Testing Requirements:
  • TOEFL
    • Paper
      • 577.0
    • Computer
      • 233.0
    • iBT
      • 90.0

Master of Engineering (MEng)

This program is oriented toward engineering practice instead of fundamental research, teaching or further study. This degree is intended to increase the competence of students who are interested in design, development, operation, and engineering practice.

Students pursuing the MEng degree option must complete at least 30 credit hours and satisfactorily prepare and defend an engineering project report. The purpose of the project report is to develop and demonstrate the candidate's ability to plan and execute projects relating to the practice of engineering.

The MEng option Plan of Study must include at least 30 credit hours that satisfy the following requirements:

  • ESM 5904 Project and Report (3 credits)
  • ESM 5014 Introduction to Continuum Mechanics (3 credits)
  • Two ESM 5xxx/6xxx courses in two of the following areas: dynamics, solid mechanics, or fluid mechanics (3 credits in each area, for a total of 6 credits)
  • One course satisfying the mathematics requirement (3 credits)
  • Graded elective courses (at least 15 credits)

MEng students must also register each semester for one credit hour of 5944 Seminar. These seminar credits are not included on the Plan of Study.

The MEng Plan of Study may contain a combination of 5xxx and 6xxx-level courses and a maximum of six (6) hours of approved 4xxx-level courses.

A minimum of 12 course credits must be labeled ESM (not including 5944 or 5994).

A maximum of six (6) credit hours of independent study (IS) or special study (SS) courses can be used to complete the Plan of Study, with the total for both IS and SS courses not exceeding six (6) hours.

Offered In (Blacksburg)

Degree Requirements

Minimum GPA: 3.0
Institution code: 5859
Testing Requirements:
  • TOEFL
    • Paper
      • 577.0
    • Computer
      • 233.0
    • iBT
      • 90.0

Students must earn a minimum of 90 credit hours beyond the bachelor’s degree. A Master’s degree is not required for admission the program.

Core Courses

  • ESM 5014: Intro to Continuum Mechanics (3 credits)
  • ESM 5314: Intermediate Dynamics (3 credits)
  • ESM 5024: Intro to Solid Mechanics (3 credits)
  • ESM 5054: Intro to Fluid Mechanics (3 credits)
  • ESM 5004: Scientific Communication in Engineering Mechanics (2 credits)

Math Courses

  • MATH 5000-6000 level courses (3 credits). See EM Graduate Regulations manual for approved Math courses.

ESM Courses

  • Additional EsM coursework, ESM 5000-6000 level courses  (6 credits). See EM Graduate Regulations manual for approved courses.

Additional Coursework

  • 5000-6000 level courses that support area of doctoral research (12 hours)

Seminar

  • ESM 5944 (Minimum of 4, one-credit hour seminars) (4 credits)

Program-specific credits from above: 39 hours

Additional Coursework

  • Agreed upon by student and advisory committee: 21 hours

Dissertation Research

  • ESM 7994 (Research/Thesis) (30 hours)
Minimum Total Credits: 90

Engineering Mechanics Graduate Program

The Engineering Mechanics graduate program has well-equipped research and teaching facilities on the Blacksburg campus for each of the supported research areas.  Approximately 40,000 square feet of space supports program activities in Norris Hall, Kelly Hall, and several of the surrounding buildings.  

To view all of our labs and facilities, visit: http://www.beam.vt.edu/research/index.php Information about some of our labs and facilities:

Bio-Inspired Fluids Lab

Sunny Jung, PI

Our group has research interests in various physical problems related to fluid-structure interaction, including bio-locomotion, interfacial dynamics, and fluid-elasticity coupling. If you are interested in any of our research, please contact Prof. Jung at sunnyjsh@vt.edu.

Bio-Inspired Engineering Lab

Jake Socha, PI

Our lab studies the biomechanics of motion in animals, conducting integrative research that crosses traditional boundaries of engineering and biology. Currently, two broad themes of our research center around gliding flight in vertebrates and internal fluid flows in invertebrates. We aim to understand animal movements both for fundamental understanding of animal physiology, ecology and evolution, and as inspiration for novel engineering applications.

Complex Systems Laboratory

Nicole Abaid, PI

The focus of the Complex Systems Laboratory is in the area of dynamical systems and control. Current research is largely focused collective behavior in multi-agent systems and spans agent-based modeling, studies of synchronization and consensus, field studies with wild animals, and bio-inspired robotic systems. Other research projects include studying the feasibility of auditory stimulation for closed-loop control of neural oscillations.

Damage Science and Mechanics

John Duke, Jr, PI

In order to assure the safety and reliability of critical assets understanding the science of how systems degrade and how this damage affects performance is critical. The Damage Science and Mechanics Laboratory works within the multiple disciplines needed to achieve this goal. Sustainable system planning and design, life-extension, system prognostics, system and structural health monitoring are areas where this work finds applications.

Kevin P. Granata Biomechanics Lab

Robin Queen, PI

The Kevin P. Granata Biomechanics Lab is the current center of research for Robin Queen, who is a fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine.  She was previously the director of the "Coach K" Lab at Duke University where she worked with a variety of industry sponsors including the Nike Sport Research Lab and DonJoy Orthopedics. Her focus is on lower extremity biomechanics with an emphasis in foot and ankle biomechanics.  Her work focuses on understanding changes in lower extremity loading and movement symmetry that result from injury and pathology.  In addition, Dr. Queen works on development of various interventions to restore movement and loading symmetry in an attempt to decrease future risk of joint damage and prevent subsequent injuries. 

LAB

James Hanna, PI

Nonlinear classical mechanics, particularly dynamics of thin structures.  Some recent topics include: impact of flexible objects; equilibria and snap-through bifurcations of cables, strips, and sheets; geometric singularities; multi-stable and collapsing structures.

Laboratory for Fluid Dynamics in Nature

Anne Staples, PI

The research at the Laboratory for Fluid Dynamics in Nature (FiNLab) is focused on two main themes: fluid flows in nature, and advanced computational methods for fluid flows. The natural systems studied at FiNLab range from insect respiratory flows, which occur at the microscale, to planetary atmospheric flows with length scales on the order of tens of kilometers. There is an emphasis on biomimetics for efficiency, resilience, and sustainability, on high performance computing, and on advanced multiscale computational modeling.

Materials Response Group

Scott Case and David Dillard, PIs

The Materials Response Group (MRG) is a research group within the Engineering Science & Mechanics Department at Virginia Tech focusing on the response of material systems to mechanical and environmental loading. Of particular interest are polymer and ceramic composites, adhesives, and scientific visualization.

Multiphysics Intelligent and Dynamical Systems

Shima Shahab, PI

Multiphysics Intelligent and Dynamical Systems (MInDS) laboratory focuses on the intersection of smart materials and dynamical systems for various interdisciplinary applications such as energy harvesting, biomimetic locomotion and contactless acoustic energy transfer; biomedical opportunities and challenges.  Current research topics at MInDS include intelligent fluid flow control using smart materials and metamaterial-inspired concepts, high-intensity focused ultrasound for wireless charging of low-power sensors, and ultrasound responsive drug delivery systems. The goal is to design new generation of smart autonomous biomedical systems which leads to new medical diagnostics and treatments.

MultiSTEPS IGERT

Mark Stremler, PI

MULTISCALE TRANSPORT IN ENVIRONMENTAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS: The MultiSTEPS program aims to prepare future leaders of industrial and academic research to think, collaborate, and solve problems at the intersection of the engineering and biological sciences.

Ross Dynamics Lab

Shane Ross, PI

The Ross Dynamics Lab performs mathematical modeling and experiments of nonlinear dynamics with applications to patterns of dispersal in oceanic and atmospheric flows, passive and active aerodynamic gliding, dynamic buckling of flexible structures, ship dynamics, orbital mechanics, and control of escaping dynamics. Dr. Ross is the Director and Recruiting Coordinator of BIOTRANS, an interdisciplinary graduate education program to cross-train graduate students in biology and engineering to work on biological transport problems in environmental and physiological systems.

Resource: BEAM department website (http://beam.vt.edu)
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